Error Processing Feed: Undefined property: Themify::$hide_meta_category at /home/wp_q64ekx/juddslivka.com/wp-content/themes/basic/themify/themify-utils.php line 3764
Error Processing Feed: Undefined property: Themify::$hide_meta_tag at /home/wp_q64ekx/juddslivka.com/wp-content/themes/basic/themify/themify-utils.php line 3765
Error Processing Feed: Undefined property: Themify::$hide_meta_comment at /home/wp_q64ekx/juddslivka.com/wp-content/themes/basic/themify/themify-utils.php line 3766
Error Processing Feed: Undefined property: Themify::$hide_meta_author at /home/wp_q64ekx/juddslivka.com/wp-content/themes/basic/themify/themify-utils.php line 3767
class="post clearfix cat-48 post-281 type-post status-publish format-standard has-post-thumbnail hentry category-media-matters tag-amplification tag-olloclip tag-social-media has-post-title has-post-date has-post-category has-post-tag has-post-comment has-post-author">
The Web amplification effect, in effect

The Web amplification effect, in effect

There was a time — and it wasn’t all that long ago — when paid media was king. But the amplification effects of social media have taken over.  But it’s more than social media. It’s the amplification effect of the entire Internet.

An example:

olloclip

The first graph is the number of mentions in social and traditional media for the camera company olloclip in the last 30 days, as tracked by CustomScoop. olloclip makes a lens set that clips on to iPhones and its hugely popular. The company has been mentioned in social and traditional media 8,239 times in the last 30 days (that would turn out an impressive CPM; also impressive: 253 mentions in the last 12 hours).  Nearly 90 percent of those mentions have been on Twitter. That’s stunning. Only 1 percent of mentions have come in magazines and there hasn’t been a single mention in daily newspapers.

This turns the media buy equation on its head. If we look a little deeper into the numbers, our 7,415 mentions on Twitter were delivered to a minimum of 10,187,260 timelines. The average number of followers is 2,058.  Even if we control for some of the people with huge Twitter followings, you’re still looking at an average follower number of more than 500. If the idea is to go where people are, why purchase any media? Why even send reviews pieces out?

As a side note, the company’s Twitter account only has 7,483 followers.

 

olloclip

Error Processing Feed: Undefined property: Themify::$hide_meta_category at /home/wp_q64ekx/juddslivka.com/wp-content/themes/basic/themify/themify-utils.php line 3764
Error Processing Feed: Undefined property: Themify::$hide_meta_tag at /home/wp_q64ekx/juddslivka.com/wp-content/themes/basic/themify/themify-utils.php line 3765
Error Processing Feed: Undefined property: Themify::$hide_meta_comment at /home/wp_q64ekx/juddslivka.com/wp-content/themes/basic/themify/themify-utils.php line 3766
Error Processing Feed: Undefined property: Themify::$hide_meta_author at /home/wp_q64ekx/juddslivka.com/wp-content/themes/basic/themify/themify-utils.php line 3767
class="post clearfix cat-11 post-276 type-post status-publish format-standard has-post-thumbnail hentry category-data tag-doce-fire tag-lessons-learned tag-social-media tag-twitter has-post-title has-post-date has-post-category has-post-tag has-post-comment has-post-author">
Social media lessons from the Doce Fire

Social media lessons from the Doce Fire

Continuing with the Doce fire…

We’re now three days into the coverage period and Tweet frequency has really gone down:docefire005

The peak is June 19 at 1 p.m. — 234 Tweets per hour. There’s a 139-Tweet hour at 5 p.m. on the 20th — right after the incident management team’s afternoon press briefing ended — but the differences between the hills and the valleys is getting smaller. There’s a flurry of activity today at 11 a.m., but interest has faded as the danger to homes has faded.

So what can we learn?

1. Broadcast, as usual in the Phoenix market, does a better job of breaking news than print. Eight of the top 10 Tweeters using the accepted hashtag “#docefire”  are from broadcast outlets.

2. The statewide paper missed an opportunity to inexpensively plant a flag in the outstate. The Arizona Republic’s online story had five reporters on the byline. Not one of them was in the top 10 in Tweets (I spoke to a former colleague there who said “We had a lot of reporters on it, but none of them are big Tweeters.”). How about the main @azcentral channel? 21 Tweets on the fire from it (@myfoxphoenix, which everyone in Tweets about a large breaking news event, had 85 fire-related Tweets. ). Ahead of the newspaper in the list of people tweeting more frequently include three Prescott “civilians.” The tragedy here is in reach. The Republic’s main Twitter handle has 40,000 followers — more than any other Arizona media, more, even, than the state’s governor (she has about 38,000).  The paper’s 26 Tweets hit more than 1 million timelines (Tweet x followers). That’s a lot of coverage that wasn’t driven right to your website.

3. The RT Effect is in full force during breaking news: Of the 3,515 #docefire Tweets since the incident began, 54 percent have been RTs. Original content goes far and the RT Effect gives newsbrands the ability to expand their potential viewership.

Error Processing Feed: Undefined property: Themify::$hide_meta_category at /home/wp_q64ekx/juddslivka.com/wp-content/themes/basic/themify/themify-utils.php line 3764
Error Processing Feed: Undefined property: Themify::$hide_meta_tag at /home/wp_q64ekx/juddslivka.com/wp-content/themes/basic/themify/themify-utils.php line 3765
Error Processing Feed: Undefined property: Themify::$hide_meta_comment at /home/wp_q64ekx/juddslivka.com/wp-content/themes/basic/themify/themify-utils.php line 3766
Error Processing Feed: Undefined property: Themify::$hide_meta_author at /home/wp_q64ekx/juddslivka.com/wp-content/themes/basic/themify/themify-utils.php line 3767
class="post clearfix cat-11 cat-10 post-272 type-post status-publish format-standard hentry category-data category-story tag-doce-fire tag-social-media tag-twitter has-post-title has-post-date has-post-category has-post-tag has-post-comment has-post-author">

Examining who’s Tweeting a breaking story

The Doce Fire has burned at least 5,000 acres near Prescott, Ariz., threatening homes, causing evacuations and making a pretty good local news story.

It also lets us take an in-depth look into the mechanics of tweeting what’s a fairly “routine” breaking news story. The next few posts will be about that.

First, let’s look at coverage. By using a proximity search within the CustomScoop monitoring engine, we’re picking up every story that has “Doce” within 15 words of “fire.” It’s a broad search, but it does the job. It doesn’t take into account the quality or depth of the mention, but for our purposes (measuring reach), it doesn’t matter if it’s a mention in a wire brief or if it’s a feature story.

Mentions of Doce within 15 words of fire in the first 27 hours of coverage

Mentions of Doce within 15 words of fire in the first 27 hours of coverage

The biggest outlet? Twitter at 33 percent of mentions. Next up, TV at 20 percent, followed by newspapers at 17 percent.

That in itself is pretty interesting. It confirms the validity — not that it needed confirming — as Twitter as a breaking news source. Here, we see a lot of frequency. But when we look deeper, the people doing much of the tweeting are news media. The top 10 tweeters using the hashtag “#docefire,” with number of tweets in parentheses.

1. @wildlandfireaz — Interagency account for wildland fire news in Arizona (61)

2. @myfoxphoenix — Phoenix Fox TV affiliate (55)

3. @12News — Phoenix NBC affiliate (53)

4. @PatrickRadioPro — Prescott, Ariz., radio personality (47)

5. @TrishaHendricks — Reporter for Phoenix NBC affiliate (43)

6.  @AmyGleich — Graduate student at Arizona State’s journalism school, primarily RTing (35)

7. @ABC15 — Phoenix ABC affiliate (33)

8. @ArizonaNewsNet — Independent news alert service (33)

9. @NancyHarrisonAZ — Northern Arizona-based manager for Phoenix NBC affiliate (33)

10. @AnitaSearchGuru — Anita Williams, Prescott resident, (31)

Eight of the top 10 are “traditional” news outlets, one (@ArizonaNewsNet) is a  Web-based outlet and one is a local person with no dog in the media game.

See who’s missing? The state’s largest newspaper, The Arizona Republic.

Tomorrow: The power of a single Tweet.

Error Processing Feed: Undefined property: Themify::$hide_meta_category at /home/wp_q64ekx/juddslivka.com/wp-content/themes/basic/themify/themify-utils.php line 3764
Error Processing Feed: Undefined property: Themify::$hide_meta_tag at /home/wp_q64ekx/juddslivka.com/wp-content/themes/basic/themify/themify-utils.php line 3765
Error Processing Feed: Undefined property: Themify::$hide_meta_comment at /home/wp_q64ekx/juddslivka.com/wp-content/themes/basic/themify/themify-utils.php line 3766
Error Processing Feed: Undefined property: Themify::$hide_meta_author at /home/wp_q64ekx/juddslivka.com/wp-content/themes/basic/themify/themify-utils.php line 3767
class="post clearfix cat-11 post-267 type-post status-publish format-standard has-post-thumbnail hentry category-data tag-conversions tag-news tag-paywall has-post-title has-post-date has-post-category has-post-tag has-post-comment has-post-author">
Losing serendipitous readers at the paywall

Losing serendipitous readers at the paywall

NiemanLab had an interesting piece today on how the Times of London is attempting to attract people to stories despite the stories being stuck behind a paywall. A developer created an HTML template that an editor can use to send to the paper’s reporters and ask them to retweet the link to the story.

Got that? To increase generational reach — that is, how far an RT goes — we’re going to email our staff and tell them to retweet. And we’ve made it frictionless for them to do it.

Of course, anyone who clicks on the RT is going to run into … wait for it … the stupid paywall. What purpose does advertising a story serve if people can’t get to it?

It’s something I’ve never understood about the ‘everything is behind the paywall all the time’ concept. If you want to attract readers, give free samples.  Limit the number of free samples — 10 a month seems to be the magic number — and if people think you’re worth something, they’ll buy the full product.

Here’s The Times’ Ben Whitelaw:

Owning an story can be hard on social media when you operate a subscription model…We thought about how we could change this and realised that our best weapon was our journalists, each with their own network of followers and fans. But we were asking a lot to expect them to keep track of stories breaking on social media (especially when on deadline) so we knew we needed a way of making it easy for them…

[Developer Alex Muller] then created an HTML template to display a single tweet inside an email, and used Twitter’s Web Intents to add links to simplify the process for journalists and others to retweet — one click in the email, and then one confirmation click on twitter.com to complete the action…

The result of using ‘The retweeter’ is that our big stories reach more people. For example, The Sunday Times Insight team had a big story on lobbying in Westminster which was retweeted by 30 people, most of whom were Sunday Times staff. Twitter analytics showed us that this tweet had reach three times greater than our usual tweets.

There are two issues: 1. The problem is misidentified (word isn’t getting out vs. people aren’t able to access it). 2. How does 30 RTs count as a victory? And the number we don’t know is the important one: How many clicks did we see from non-subscribers who followed this path:

Viewed Tweet –> Hit paywall –> Paid for access